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Thread: The recommend-a-beer thread

  1. #1241
    Inland Emperor Azagthoth's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by BeerMan View Post
    as mentioned in the other thread, these Vertical Epics are meant to be aged.

    have you had Kona's Pipeline Porter? I like them better than the Fire Rock, which is a bit thin IMHO. or maybe I was thinking of their Longboard Island Lager. come to think of it, I haven't had the Fire Rock in a while, which is probably why.
    Yes, they are supposed to hold out until 2012 but I definitely don't see that happening with the 09 only because it came off as very weak in terms of hops and had what seemed like a rather debilitated body to it. I'm not saying it won't be enjoyable by any means, I just don't see it peaking at the appropriate point. Maybe the 8%+ ABV will help it out, but I don't see the malt & hop profiles hanging in there. The 08 VE I loved, but again was one that probably won't make it to 2012 because of that Belgian IPA style which will result in fainted hops pretty quickly. The 07 was a great example fresh, of one that should age nicely over the span of years.

    I need to try the Pipeline Porter. Next time I'm at an Island's I'll hit it up. The Fire Rock tasted a lot like the Sierra Nevada Pale Ale (I'm guessing the cascade hop) but a bit thin.

  2. #1242
    Inland Emperor Azagthoth's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by Bogey View Post
    I'm getting into beer more and based on this Wikipedia link there are two main varities of beer:

    1) Ales
    -Stouts
    -Porters
    -Lambics
    -Pales, browns, reds, etc.

    and

    2) Lagers
    -Pilsners
    -Bocks
    -Malt liquors

    Am I on the right track or . . . ?
    Edumacate me.
    The easiest way to remember the difference, is that ales use top fermenting yeast strains, and lagers (it's a misnomer and will explain why) use bottom fermenting yeast strains. Under each of the two styles, you have many styles to be found within. Here is an example of some common styles of ales that you'll see....

    Ales: Amber Ale, Pale Ale, India Pale Ale, Stouts, Porters, Strong Ales, Old Ales, Barleywine Style Ale, Dubbel, Tripel, Witbier, Biere de Garde......

    Sometimes more styles within come into play by country, such as an American Pale Ale (Sierra Nevada Pale Ale) vs. English Pale Ale (Bass). Two common albeit VERY different beers and distinct styles of their own. Same goes for an American Imperial Stout (Speedway Stout) Vs. a Russian Imperial Stout (Old Rasputin). Interestingly enough, Russian Imperial Stouts are actually English in origin, but you'll learn the history of these beers along the way. The point is, that there are many styles within an ale, and they are quite broad but very identifiable once you've become accustomed to a particular style. The best thing to do next time you're at Bevmo (or wherever you shop) is to start out with 10 bottles of something different so you can begin to learn styles and pick out for yourself what makes them different from one another. Based on what you pick up, I would recommend drinking them in a certain order, and if you get to this PM me and I would be glad to help you out.

    Usually your ales are going to be heavier in terms of Alcohol By Volume, body, and bitterness of the beer, but not always! A good rule of thumb too is to never let the color of a beer fool you. Just because it is lighter in color means absolutely nothing. If a beer is dark, that is by no means an indication that it will be heavy, boozy, bitter, or unlikable.

    The word lager, is German for "to age". This refers to the brewing process of "lagers", since they used quite a bit of time to brew and ferment until they were ready for consumption. I forget the exact history behind it, but it had something to do with the Germans not having refrigeration back in the day, so they had to keep the barrels of beer underground in cool areas during the warm months to ferment so they wouldn't spoil from the heat. I think that is where the "to age" comes from, but don't quote me.

    In actuality, the word lager really isn't a style of beer. It confuses the hell out of many Germans that come to an English speaking country and are told that they have "to age" on their tap selection In general, the Germans like to think of the typical "yellow" beer as either a Pilsner or Helles Lager. Helles is bright in German. They used the word helles to classify yellow beers, compared to some of their weiss (white) beers that they drink. But for all intents and purposes right now, the beer community has universally accepted "lager" as the style of beer that uses bottom fermenting yeast strains.

    Here is an example of some common styles of lagers that you'll see....

    Amber Lager, Pale Lager, Dark Lager, Pilsner, Bock, Doppelbock, Eisbock...

    Again, some styles are assigned to certain countries. American Pale Lager (Moosehead) vs. Euro Pale Lager (Heineken). German Pilsener (Beck's) vs. Czech Pilsener (Pilsner Urquell).

    You'll be surprised that a Doppelbock or an Eisbock (both lagers) will knock your socks off and perhaps more than many ales on the market. And remember, those doppelbocks and eisbocks are in the same family as your yellow (helles) beers. The best thing to remember is to never let color or appearance mislead you into thinking that it will be watered down or stronger/more bitter than you can handle.

    I hope this helps !

    And please remember, that neither Widmer or Pyramid are Hefeweizens! They're actually American Pale Wheat Ales. And if you hear somebody refer to either as a "hef", please slap them upside the head Even worse, is when the server says "We have Bud, Miller, Coors, and Hef". AHGHGHGHGH !!!!

    You wouldn't ask for a Stout if you wanted a Budweiser, right?
    Last edited by Azagthoth; September 15th, 2009 at 07:22 AM.

  3. #1243
    With us always. DougW8's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by Azagthoth View Post
    The easiest way to remember the difference, is that ales use top fermenting yeast strains, and lagers (it's a misnomer and will explain why) use bottom fermenting yeast strains. Under each of the two styles, you have many styles to be found within. Here is an example of some common styles of ales that you'll see....

    Ales: Amber Ale, Pale Ale, India Pale Ale, Stouts, Porters, Strong Ales, Old Ales, Barleywine Style Ale, Dubbel, Tripel, Witbier, Biere de Garde......

    Sometimes more styles within come into play by country, such as an American Pale Ale (Sierra Nevada Pale Ale) vs. English Pale Ale (Bass). Two common albeit VERY different beers and distinct styles of their own. Same goes for an American Imperial Stout (Speedway Stout) Vs. a Russian Imperial Stout (Old Rasputin). Interestingly enough, Russian Imperial Stouts are actually English in origin, but you'll learn the history of these beers along the way. The point is, that there are many styles within an ale, and they are quite broad but very identifiable once you've become accustomed to a particular style. The best thing to do next time you're at Bevmo (or wherever you shop) is to start out with 10 bottles of something different so you can begin to learn styles and pick out for yourself what makes them different from one another. Based on what you pick up, I would recommend drinking them in a certain order, and if you get to this PM me and I would be glad to help you out.

    Usually your ales are going to be heavier in terms of Alcohol By Volume, body, and bitterness of the beer, but not always! A good rule of thumb too is to never let the color of a beer fool you. Just because it is lighter in color means absolutely nothing. If a beer is dark, that is by no means an indication that it will be heavy, boozy, bitter, or unlikable.

    The word lager, is German for "to age". This refers to the brewing process of "lagers", since they used quite a bit of time to brew and ferment until they were ready for consumption. I forget the exact history behind it, but it had something to do with the Germans not having refrigeration back in the day, so they had to keep the barrels of beer underground in cool areas during the warm months to ferment so they wouldn't spoil from the heat. I think that is where the "to age" comes from, but don't quote me.

    In actuality, the word lager really isn't a style of beer. It confuses the hell out of many Germans that come to an English speaking country and are told that they have "to age" on their tap selection In general, the Germans like to think of the typical "yellow" beer as either a Pilsner or Helles Lager. Helles is bright in German. They used the word helles to classify yellow beers, compared to some of their weiss (white) beers that they drink. But for all intents and purposes right now, the beer community has universally accepted "lager" as the style of beer that uses bottom fermenting yeast strains.

    Here is an example of some common styles of lagers that you'll see....

    Amber Lager, Pale Lager, Dark Lager, Pilsner, Bock, Doppelbock, Eisbock...

    Again, some styles are assigned to certain countries. American Pale Lager (Moosehead) vs. Euro Pale Lager (Heineken). German Pilsener (Beck's) vs. Czech Pilsener (Pilsner Urquell).

    You'll be surprised that a Doppelbock or an Eisbock (both lagers) will knock your socks off and perhaps more than many ales on the market. And remember, those doppelbocks and eisbocks are in the same family as your yellow (helles) beers. The best thing to remember is to never let color or appearance mislead you into thinking that it will be watered down or stronger/more bitter than you can handle.

    I hope this helps !

    And please remember, that neither Widmer or Pyramid are Hefeweizens! They're actually American Pale Wheat Ales. And if you hear somebody refer to either as a "hef", please slap them upside the head Even worse, is when the server says "We have Bud, Miller, Coors, and Hef". AHGHGHGHGH !!!!

    You wouldn't ask for a Stout if you wanted a Budweiser, right?
    Are you any relation to the Azagthoth I once shared a pitcher with at Round Table in La Verne? I know it has been said before, but you have come a long way my friend. You have been cellered at just the right temperature, and have aged well.

  4. #1244
    It's all good man Bogey's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by Azagthoth View Post
    The easiest way to remember the difference is . . . you wouldn't ask for a Stout if you wanted a Budweiser, right?
    I'm gonna print out what you posted and read it several times.

    Thanks!

  5. #1245
    Hell yes. UnholyGoalie's Avatar




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    Bogey, here's a good link to study:

    Beer Styles - BeerAdvocate

    I too will be studying what Az just wrote! Reading is one thing but going out and tasting is another. Read this thread and see if you can find some of the beers reviewed here. Buy them and drink them. Keep track of what aspects you liked and what you didn't. Go from there!

  6. #1246
    It's all good man Bogey's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by UnholyGoalie View Post
    Bogey, here's a good link to study:

    Beer Styles - BeerAdvocate

    I too will be studying what Az just wrote! Reading is one thing but going out and tasting is another. Read this thread and see if you can find some of the beers reviewed here. Buy them and drink them. Keep track of what aspects you liked and what you didn't. Go from there!
    Already on it somewhat.

    Been doing beer tasting over the last few weeks.

    Thanks for the link and advice.

  7. #1247
    Inland Emperor Azagthoth's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by UnholyGoalie View Post
    Bogey, here's a good link to study:

    Beer Styles - BeerAdvocate

    Keep track of what aspects you liked and what you didn't. Go from there!
    Good advice.

    Try to avoid (or at least don't take seriously) the Top 100 Beer List on beeradvocate.com or any of the overall beer scores/reviews that are figured by the users reviews. So many of those beers are overhyped, therefore resulting in imprecise ratings. Many are underrated too, just because the wide majority of BA favors Double IPAs and any hop bomb type of beer.

    You don't want to miss out on any great brews just because they have a low score on beeradvocate. I used to make that mistake and fortunately was able to learn from it!

  8. #1248
    FIRE BETTMAN!! BeerMan's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by DougW8 View Post
    Are you any relation to the Azagthoth I once shared a pitcher with at Round Table in La Verne? I know it has been said before, but you have come a long way my friend. You have been cellered at just the right temperature, and have aged well.
    big plus one right there. dude I used to know by the same name worshipped whatever light beers were on sale at a 7-11.

    now this one? damn if I know. as I've said before, and will say again, we've done a damn good job turning this young feller around to the good brews. high 5's!
    I BELIEVE I'll have another beer!

  9. #1249
    RIP my Tanner! \_==o IxxI's Avatar




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    And please remember, that neither Widmer or Pyramid are Hefeweizens! They're actually American Pale Wheat Ales.
    I like Pyramid a lot, will you recommend some American Pale Wheat Ales that I can purchase at BevMo?

  10. #1250
    Inland Emperor Azagthoth's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by \_==o IxxI View Post
    I like Pyramid a lot, will you recommend some American Pale Wheat Ales that I can purchase at BevMo?
    Sierra Nevada Wheat
    New Belgium Sunshine
    North Coast Blue Star

    Goose Island 312, Arcadia Whitsun, and Bell's Oberon are also well crafted brews in that style, but you won't find those at bevmo. You can get them at Buy beer online @ BeerGeek.biz

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