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Thread: Nicol Williamson...we hardly knew ye.

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    I'llPutPenniesOnYourEyes jerseydevil's Avatar




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    Default Nicol Williamson...we hardly knew ye.

    BBC News - Excalibur actor Nicol Williamson dies at 75

    Scottish actor Nicol Williamson, best known for his role as the wizard Merlin in the 1981 film Excalibur, has died aged 75, his family has announced.

    The actor passed away of oesophageal cancer shortly before Christmas in Amsterdam, where he lived.

    A much respected stage actor, he was nominated for his first Tony Award in 1966 for Inadmissible Evidence.

    Playwright John Osborne once called him "the greatest actor since Marlon Brando."

    Williamson was nominated for his second Tony Award in 1974, for his role in Anton Chekhov's Uncle Vanya. He won a Drama Desk award the same year for the role.

    Born in Hamilton, South Lanarkshire, he attended the Birmingham School of Speech and Drama.

    He made his professional stage debut at the Dundee Repertory Theatre in 1960, before appearing in Tony Richardson's production of A Midsummer Night's Dream at the Royal Court Theatre.

    He later teamed up with Richardson again, to star his Hamlet production at the Roundhouse.

    It was so successful, it transferred to Broadway and was adapted into a film, which co-starred Anthony Hopkins and Marianne Faithfull.

    In a statement on the actor's website, his son Luke Williamson said: "It's with great sadness, and yet with a heart full of pride and love for a man who was a tremendous father, friend, actor, poet, writer and singer, that I must bring news of Nicol's passing."

    He went on to say his father passed "peacefully" ending his two struggle with cancer.

    "He gave it all he had: never gave up, never complained, maintained his wicked sense of humour to the end. His last words were 'I love you'. I was with him, he was not alone, he was not in pain."

    The actor's son Luke Williamson, said his father was also survived by his wife, Jill Townsend.

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    devenir gris gescom's Avatar




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    It is a lonely life, the way of the necromancer... oh, yes. Lacrimae Mundi - the tears of the world.

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    I'llPutPenniesOnYourEyes jerseydevil's Avatar




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    Nicol Williamson 1936 - 2011
    Ain't It Cool News: The best in movie, TV, DVD, and comic book news.

    Another good obit...sad really

    My earliest memory of Williamson is also the most indelible: his Merlin in John Boorman's EXCALIBUR was my introduction to the backwards-living wizard of Arthurian lore, and I've never been able to shake his intense, occasionally flamboyant portrayal. It's a bold, non-traditional interpretation (matched by Helen Mirren's wicked, hot-as-blazes Morgana), which I later learned was Williamson's m.o. Whether reinterpreting Hamlet as a neurotic cynic in Tony Richardson's celebrated 1969 production or boldly tackling Nicolas Meyer's cocaine-addled Sherlock Holmes in THE SEVEN-PER-CENT SOLUTION, Williams was renowned for never playing it safe.

    This was an extension of his mercurial personality, which often made him a handful to deal with; he was notorious for walking off the stage mid-performance, going off-book or worse. During the 1965 Philadelphia tryout of John Osborne's INADMISSIBLE EVIDENCE (in which Williamson originated the role of Maitland), he socked the powerful theatrical producer David Merrick. Fortunately, Williamson was too talented to be fired; a year later, he'd win his first Tony Award in this critically-acclaimed production. There were other outbursts over the years, the most memorable being his erratic behavior during the Broadway run of Paul Rudnick's I HATE HAMLET. Perhaps going a bit method as the ghost of John Barrymore, Williamson criticized the writing of the play, improvised when he felt his fellow actors weren't performing with enough zest, and, during a bit of stage combat, struck the show's lead, Evan Handler, in the back with the flat part of his sword. This was perhaps accidental, but Handler didn't care; he promptly quit the show, leaving his understudy to finish the performance and the rest of the run.

    Though ever unpredictable, casting Williamson was always worth the risk. When fully engaged, his performances are the stuff of constant discovery; moment to moment, you feel his restlessness, his desire to seek out emotionally precarious territory. This fervid approach occasionally invited accusations of camp, but there was nothing cheap or sensational about Williamson's choices; he could've been as ruthlessly precise as Olivier, but this would've bored him senseless. Williamson wanted to have fun; he wanted to locate the madness in his characters, and get a little crazy himself. It's a daredevil trait he shared with Brando (to whom Osborne once compared him).

    Like Brando, Williamson ultimately tired of acting. Over the last fifteen years, he indulged his love for music and poetry, some of which you can sample on his official website. Williamson was evidently living in poverty, but his son says he "never gave up, never complained [and] maintained his wicked sense of humor to the end." I am glad that he found peace, but I am also grateful that it was the last thing he was looking for as an actor. He was a delightfully unsettling talent. We should all live and create with such abandon.

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