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Thread: Linux recommendations.

  1. #1
    is watching you.... King Taco's Avatar




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    Default Linux recommendations.

    So I'm interested in Linux, and I'm want to know if there are significant differences in the free distros available. I'm running this through VMWare, so I hope that doesn't pose a problem.

    Have at it!

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    Muffisher mudfisher's Avatar




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    I have been running Ubuntu 9.10 x64 for the last few months. If you have not used Linux before the learning curve is rather steep. Ubuntu is probably the best and easiest to get a hold of and learn off of. However, I would recommend 32bit at the momment due to the fact that there are many driver issues that pop up with x64 compared to x32.

    I like linux alot. However, I think it still has a quite a ways to grow to become more user friendly.

  3. #3
    The gates have opened RoyalPain's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by mudfisher View Post
    I have been running Ubuntu 9.10 x64 for the last few months. If you have not used Linux before the learning curve is rather steep. Ubuntu is probably the best and easiest to get a hold of and learn off of. However, I would recommend 32bit at the momment due to the fact that there are many driver issues that pop up with x64 compared to x32.

    I like linux alot. However, I think it still has a quite a ways to grow to become more user friendly.
    Agreed Ubuntu is your best bet right now. And yes the User interface although not on par with Windows or Apple (debatable) it can use some improvement which from what I have read the next version of the Gnome interface is really going to be great.

    The learning curve isn't really that hard but it can be steep.

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    is watching you.... King Taco's Avatar




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    Can you either of you elaborate on the learning curve?

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    Muffisher mudfisher's Avatar




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    Not all applications can be installed through the gui. Some still require the terminal window.

    If you don't know how to use the terminal window and the command prompts you will need to get use to googling for help quick. But that is how you will learn.

    Not all plugins work efficiently through the web browsers.

    Adobe support is iffy sometimes.

    Seamonkey is a offshoot of FireFox and it tends to be better for the more advanced sites that use flash and etc..

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    The gates have opened RoyalPain's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by King Taco View Post
    Can you either of you elaborate on the learning curve?
    It's like going from Windows to Apple. same concept just different looks. When installing software you have to enter your password to install it. You can't use blank passwords in Linux so make sure you use a password that you can remember.

    It isn't all that different it just takes some getting used to seeing things in different locations that what you are used to.

    When looking for new software programs that are not in the Ubuntu software repository make sure you get the ".deb" file for the architecture you install [32-Bit/AMD64 (AMD64 is for all 64-bit OS based on the Intel platform)]

    Just install it in your virtual environment and enjoy playing with it, and if you run into problems just post in here or do a simple search on the Ubuntu forums and you will be amazed on how much support is there for you, For Free

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    The gates have opened RoyalPain's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by mudfisher View Post
    Not all applications can be installed through the gui. Some still require the terminal window.

    If you don't know how to use the terminal window and the command prompts you will need to get use to googling for help quick. But that is how you will learn.

    Not all plugins work efficiently through the web browsers.

    Adobe support is iffy sometimes.

    Seamonkey is a offshoot of FireFox and it tends to be better for the more advanced sites that use flash and etc..
    Really?? I have very little problems with the web plug-ins. I also use Google Chrome for a browser yes it is the developer addition but it is blazingly fast. But I have very few issues. I have seen Adobe product issues with firefox that required the re-installation of the plugin but that fixed it.

    you can install a lot of software now with the GUI in fact most of the software now can be installed via GUI unless you need to compile it. But installing software via the GUI is fairly simple and not complex as many people claim it is. Example of installing an FTP server "sudo apt-get install proftpd" hit enter and answer Y to the prompt and it installs for you. then install a GUI program GADMIN-PROFTP and you can do all the rest from the GUI.

    There is also a great resource for learning to use and install software with Ubuntu Ubuntu Geek|Ubuntu Linux Tutorials,Howtos,Tips & News | Intrepid,Jaunty,Karmic This site will teach you a lot about Ubuntu.

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    Muffisher mudfisher's Avatar




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    Royal are you running x32 or X64?

  9. #9
    The gates have opened RoyalPain's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by mudfisher View Post
    Royal are you running x32 or X64?
    Both. 32 on the laptop and 64 on the desktop.

  10. #10
    2nd Scoring Line Dawdler's Avatar




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    here is another vote for Ubuntu 9.10 as a starter OS, I've been playing around with Ubuntu as my host and XP as my guest host on Virtualbox and yes there are some difficulties but with the deb installs it becomes easier, its the tar files that might trip you up, but the beauty of Linux is once you figure it out, things will run a lot smoother.

    good luck with your choice

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