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Thread: 2014 Draft Thread

  1. #11
    Enjoy the chaos King'sPawn's Avatar




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    Thank you everyone for your congratulations!

    And RockPile, I did not work the Kings into the vows, but I did work some George Carlin in there

    Edit: Back on point of the thread. There will be a couple more Russians I'm writing about. One I had planned to do. Another was actually brought to my attention by someone who has watched a lot of their games.
    Last edited by King'sPawn; March 13th, 2014 at 06:29 PM.
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  2. #12
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    Ivan Nikolishin


    BIO
    DOB: 4/12/1996
    Height: 5’8
    Weight: 158 lbs
    Team: Everett Silvertips, WHL
    Position: Center
    Shoots: Left

    Rankings
    Central Scouting: 201st among North American skaters

    Articles
    Nikolishin and Hopponen were essentially in a dead heat for Everett's second European roster spot. Nikolishin's ability to play center played a large role in breaking the deadlock, as did his exceptional puck skills.

    "We had a very difficult decision to make in regarding who we'd keep," Everett coach Kevin Constantine said. "I thought Hopponen did an equally good job; it wasn't where there was a clear difference between the two.

    "Ivan's puck skills, his confidence, his vision, his passing, we think are exceptional," Constantine continued. "That's a skill not found in a lot of players and it's a nice additional thing to have on a team. I think he really knows the game."
    Silvertips' Nikolishin valued for his puck savvy | HeraldNet.com - Sports

    For those who may fondly remember the dependable two-way play of long-time pro and former Russian national team player and NHLer Andrei Nikolishin, it should come as no surprise that his son Ivan Nikolishin is the player Russian U18 national team coach Pavel Baulin has been turning to whenever anything of great importance has needed to be taken care of in the first three games of the 2013 Ivan Hlinka Memorial Tournament.

    With two assists and a +1 rating in the three preliminary-round games, Nikolishin has been instrumental in helping Russia earn its way to its semi-final match against Canada on the strength of a 2-1 victory over Slovakia and a convincing 7-3 victory over Finland.

    Still, that stat line doesn’t come close to fairly representing his overall contributions to the team. Just about every time Russia has been on the power play, Nikolishin has been on the ice making life miserable for opposing defences.
    Like father, like son

    My Take
    Nikolishin is certainly a very likeable player. He is second in scoring on his team and third in the WHL among rookies. His size is an obvious issue, but he plays a bigger game. He effectively used his body to separate players off of the puck, and delivered some decent albeit unspectacular hits. While this will probably be a bigger challenge as he plays against more difficult competition, he also has a father who played in the NHL for many years who can help him learn the good habits of a professional and make appropriate adjustments.

    I like his vision and passing. He has had some shifts where he just disappears, but considering he’s a rookie, this should be overlooked. What I like is he plays physical, like Kozun did, but he plays a more purposeful game, like Weal. I could see him being grabbed between the third and fifth round.

    2013-2014 Statistics
    Hlinka Memorial U-18: 4 GP, 0g, 2a, 2 pts, 2 PIM, 0
    WHL Regular: 72 GP, 18g, 41a, 59 pts, 16 PIM, -4
    WJC U-18: 5 GP, 2g, 3a, 5 pts, 0 PIM, -1

    Video
    Last edited by King'sPawn; June 15th, 2014 at 09:40 AM.
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  3. #13
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    Before I start writing about the next prospect I am watching, I wanted to post some information of Lombardi's drafting histrory and tendencies. This should help you look at, from a scouting perspective what Lombardi and co. are drawn towards. Of course, there are "outliers" which can happen in every trend, so don't misinterpret this as "Lombardi will never draft this guy because of x." It's just a bit of research that I find interesting. Hopefully, you do too.

    League Spread
    A very large portion of Lombardi’s picks was taken out of a league playing in North America (55 out of 62 – 89%). Only seven players in the past eight drafts were playing in Europe. Of the 55 picks in North America, 38 were taken out of the major junior Leagues – 18 out of the Ontario Hockey League (OHL), 12 out of the Western Hockey League (WHL), and eight out of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (QMJHL).

    Only 14 players have been taken from a league exclusively in the United States, with an even split of seven players drafted out of both the NCAA and the United States Hockey League (USHL). Keep in mind the United States National Training and Development Program (USNTDP) is a part of the USHL.

    The three remaining players taken out of North America were participants of minor junior hockey leagues: one from the British Columbia Hockey League (BCHL), one from North American Hockey League (NAHL), and one from the Quebec Junior A Hockey League (QJAHL). Lombardi has never drafted a player directly out of high school.

    Clearly, there is a strong draw towards prospects participating in North American leagues, which will become more evident when the players drafted out of Europe are examined.

    Team Affinity
    Kings’ Co-Director of Amateur Scouting Mike Futa used to be the General Manager of the Owen Sound Attack. As a former general manager, it’s safe to assume he has some connections. Out of the 62 picks, the Kings have picked two players, Simmonds and David Kolomatis, from Owen Sound. Kurtis MacDermid was an undrafted free agent signing. However, the Attack is not the only team the Kings have frequently drawn players:
    Guelph Storm – Three players (Drew Doughty, Zac Leslie, Justin Auger)
    Regina Pats – Three players (Linden Rowat, Colten Teubert, Jordan Weal)
    USNTDP – Three players (Robbie Czarnik, Derek Forbort, Hudson Fasching)
    Sault Ste. Marie Greyhounds – Three players (Jordan Nolan, Andrew Campbell, Colin Miller)
    St. Cloud State – Two players (Garrett Roe, Jonny Brodzinski, as well as having Nic Dowd and Kevin Gravel committed to the team)
    Miami University (Ohio) – Two players (Alec Martinez and Jeff Zatkoff)
    Barrie Colts – Two players (Kyle Clifford and Tanner Pearson)
    Seattle Thunderbirds – Two players (Bud Holloway and Thomas Hickey)
    Calgary Hitmen – One player, Brandon Kozun (but two undrafted free agent signings; defenseman Alex Roach and goaltender Martin Jones)

    The “Top” Constant
    Without fail, Dean Lombardi has drafted at least one player who participated in the CHL Top Prospects Game – a game featuring the top ranked players eligible for the upcoming entry draft who play in the OHL, WHL, and QMJHL:
    2006 – Jonathan Bernier
    2007 – Hickey, Oscar Moller, Rowat
    2008 – Doughty, Teubert
    2009 – Brayden Schenn
    2010 – Tyler Toffoli, Weal
    2011 – Christopher Gibson
    2012 – Pearson
    2013 – Valentin Zykov
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  4. #14
    Enjoy the chaos King'sPawn's Avatar




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    Positional Spread
    There’s a common ratio of forwards to defensemen to goalies in an NHL game – 12:6:2. Lombardi, while he started his tenure with the idea to build from the net out, has maintained a similar division with his drafts: 38 forwards, 18 defensemen, and six goalies.

    With the forwards, many publications have discrepancies between positions; is a player a center, a left wing, or right wing? There's also the point of coaches having multiple uses for forwards. As a result, the forwards will be broken down no further.

    Lombardi has stated in the past, however, how much he loves right-handed defensemen. However, the handedness is an even split of 50%

    The goalies have always caught left. The Kings have never gone two drafts in a row without drafting a goaltender (albeit an irrelevant observation, since the Kings took a goaltender last year). Of the six goalies taken, three were drafted out of the QMJHL (Jonathan Bernier, Christopher Gibson, and Jean-Francois Berube). No goalies have ever been drafted by Lombardi out of the OHL. Considering the OHL is the most common league in which the Kings draft prospects, this trend stands out.

    Size Matters?
    The Los Angeles Kings are typically a very big team. There’s no player on the active roster smaller than 6-foot-0. For a fair spread, each of the players drafted were put in one of three size categories: less than 6-foot-0 (hereafter called “small”), between 6-foot-0 and 6-foot-1 (“medium”), and taller than 6-foot-1 (“large”). The players are categorized by how tall they were at the time they were drafted (based on draft results posted on nhl.com). Thomas Hickey, for example, grew an inch and thus changed size categories since 2007.

    Of those size brackets, Lombardi has drafted 14 small players (10 forwards, three defensemen, one goalie). He picked 28 medium prospects (15 forwards, eight defensemen, five goalies). Finally, 20 prospects fall into the large category (13 forwards, seven defensemen).

    There is definitely a tendency to go after larger players, or at least avoid the smaller players. The most remarkable combination is the limiting of small defensemen and the absence of large goalies drafted.

    Nationality Spread
    Just under a half of Lombardi’s picks have been Canadian (30 out of 62 – 48%). There have been 19 Americans taken. Of the 13 Europeans picked, there is a predominance of Russians (five) picked. There have been three Swedish and Czech players grabbed. Rounding out the Europeans are one German and one Finnish player.

    The most notable omission from that list? Not one player of Slovak descent has been picked.

    Keep in mind this isn’t a testament of the quality of Slovak players, or even suggesting bias against players of Slovak descent. The greater number of some nationalities suggests more resources are simply deployed in specific spots.

    The European’s Commitment
    As stated above, some players are watched in specific regions, but there is more to the European study than simple geographic location. Almost every player of European descent drafted by Lombardi was either already playing in North America or ready to travel immediately to North America. Only Niclas Andersen and Constantin Braun, two picks from the 2006 Draft, have stayed in Europe their entire careers. Five more players who were in Europe at the time they were drafted came to North America to play the following season – Nikolai Prokhorkin, Maxim Kitsyn, Michael Schumacher, Slava Voynov, Andrei Loktionov.

    That leaves six European players who were drafted out of North America – Valentin Zykov, Dominik Kubalik, Patrik Bartosak, Tomas Hyka, Christopher Gibson, and Oscar Moller. Of those, three were taken out of the QMJHL, two were drafted out of the WHL, and one out of the OHL.

    The two European goalies drafted (Gibson from Finland and Bartosak from the Czech Republic) were actually drafted out of the major junior leagues in Canada. It’s important to note Lombardi has not taken a goaltender straight out of Europe.

    It’s safe to conclude Lombardi wants players who are willing to make a commitment to the NHL, and one definitive way to show dedication is to cross the pond sooner rather than later.
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  5. #15
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    First Round
    Of the eight picks he has made in the first round, all selections have been North American. None of the players were drafted out of college or minor junior leagues. Forward Tanner Pearson and defenseman Drew Doughty have come from the OHL. Forward Brayden Schenn and defensemen Colten Teubert and Thomas Hickey represent the WHL selections. Goaltender Jonathan Bernier is the lone player from the QMJHL. Forward Trevor Lewis and defenseman Derek Forbort factor in from the USHL.

    Half of his first round picks have been defensemen, and 37.5% of the players have come from the WHL.

    Second Round
    Of his eight picks in the second round, Lombardi has used half of his picks on European players - two Russians (Slava Voynov and Valentin Zykov), one Finnish (Gibson), one Swedish (Moller). Three Canadians have been taken (Toffoli, Simmonds, Clifford). Joey Ryan was the only American drafted. Voynov was the only player taken out of Europe. Three players were from both the QMJHL and the OHL, and only Moller was taken out of the WHL.

    That is a spread of five forwards, two defensemen, and one goalie. The second round is also the most frequent round in which European players were taken (four out of 13).

    Third Round
    Much like the first round, this round has historically been exclusively for North Americans. Of the 10 third round picks, seven have been Canadian and three have been American. This is also the highest round the Kings have taken a player out of the NCAA. Three players have come out of the OHL (forwards Bryan Cameron and Andy Andreoff, as well as defenseman Andrew Campbell). Three forwards were in the WHL (Bud Holloway, Geordie Wudrick, Weal). One defenseman has come from the QMJHL (Nick Deslauriers, who is now being converted to left wing). Two players were collegiate players (forward Nick Shore and goalie Jeff Zatkoff). Forward Robbie Czarnik is the only USHL player drafted in the third round.

    Seven forwards have been taken in the third round, as well as two defensemen and one goalie.

    Fourth Round
    Four of the nine picks in the fourth round have been Canadian. Three Americans were drafted. One Swede (Niclas Andersen) and one Russian (Nikolai Prokhorkin) round out the nationalities. Justin Auger was the first OHL player taken in the fourth round by the Kings. Linden Vey and Dwight King were the two forwards taken from the WHL. Berube was the only player taken from the QMJHL. Hudson Fasching was the first USHL player taken in the fourth round. Defenseman Alec Martinez and forward Michael Mersch were the two collegiate players.

    The fourth round is the only round in which the major junior leagues don’t dominate the league spread.

    Fifth Round
    The fifth round is the lowest round a goalie has been taken. It is also the highest round a player from minor junior has been taken (forward Joel Lowry of the BCHL and defenseman Martin Nolet of the QJAHL). Finally, it is the only round in which a different nationality has been drafted more than Canadian. Five Americans, four Canadians, one Russian and one Czech player divided the eleven picks, the highest number of picks the Kings have made than any other round.
    Two defensemen have come from the OHL (David Kolomatis and Colin Miller). Two goalies hail from the WHL (Rowat and Bartosak). Two players represent the USHL (forward Josh Turnbull and defenseman Kevin Gravel). Two forwards were in college (David Meckler and Jonny Brodzinski). Andrei Loktionov was the only player out of Europe.

    A total of five forwards, four defensemen, and two goalies have been taken in the fifth round.

    Sixth Round
    Three of the eight players have been taken out of the OHL (forwards Justin Azevedo and Michael Pelech, defenseman Zac Leslie). Forward Brandon Kozun was the only player drafted from the WHL. Hyka was the only QMJHL player the Kings have found in this round. Defenseman Paul Ladue represents the USHL in this round. Kitsyn and Braun were the European connections.

    The Kings took six forwards and two defensemen.

    Seventh Round
    The Kings have made another eight picks in this round, with three Canadians, three Americans, one Swede (Michael Schumacher), and one Czech player (Dominik Kubalik). Four players have come from the OHL, more than any other round (forwards Jordan Nolan and Kubalik, defensemen Josh Kidd and Nick Ebert). Forward Matt Fillier represents the QMJHL. Garrett Roe was the player from the NCAA. Schumacher was playing in Sweden at the time of the draft. Nic Dowd of the NAHL finalizes the minor junior contingent.

    In total, six forwards and two defensemen were picked in the seventh round.
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  6. #16
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    You can assume this is all coincidental, which would mean the scouts have been deployed evenly. It would also indicate an equal amount of research (or none at all) has been done on the players, their families, and their desires to play for the NHL one day. Such a stance would make the entire process obsolete, and the general managers of the league could just buy various scouting guides to pick the players who have the best articles.

    But general managers make some of the most important franchise decisions during the draft, and such choices should not be left to independent scouting reports. The scouting services were split in 2008 between defensemen Zach Bogosian and Drew Doughty. It took Lombardi challenging Doughty to lose weight after the combine to see how committed an individual is to being a part of the team.

    So there is an inherent assumption Lombardi and his scouts have a bias. If the Kings haven’t spent a first round pick on a player in Europe, it’s safe to think the Kings would not want to spend such a high price unless many of the scouts, including Lombardi, have seen a player and interviewed the families. Since Los Angeles has drafted three goalies out of the QMJHL, a historically high scoring league, it’s possible the Kings want to have goaltenders who get a lot of different challenges against them. With 11 forwards taken from the OHL, more than the total number of players taken in any other league (minus the WHL, which the Kings have drafted from 12 times), you can say the Kings put more value and resources into that league.

    If you do follow the draft, look for the following things if you want to watch the next potential Kings prospect ahead of time:
    - Since he always somehow manages to get a player who participated in the Top Prospects game, I wouldn't be shocked if he grabbed another. A list of participants this year: BMO Top Prospects Game
    - Avoid Slovaks. This isn’t to suggest Lombardi is anti-Slovak, but he just hasn’t drafted any in eight years. His scouts presumably just don’t see enough of them to want to spend a pick, or the homework hasn’t yielded whether or not certain players want to commit to the NHL.
    - Avoid European goaltenders, unless they are already playing in North America. If Lombardi does take a goaltender, he will very likely be 18 years old. With Bartosak, Jones and Berube all in the professional ranks starting next season, drafting an over-age goalie would run the risk of someone delegated to background duty.
    - First round picks are mostly spent on defensemen and predominantly in major junior leagues. They are most frequently Canadian players. He usually doesn’t get small defensemen, so look for medium or large sized.
    - In the second round, don’t be shocked to see a European player picked. He will either already be playing in North America, or he’ll be taken in the CHL Import Draft. It’s very likely the Kings will pick at least one player of European descent. The 2009 draft is the only draft in which the Kings haven’t taken a European. Lombardi has never taken more than three in one draft.
    - The Kings have drafted from the OHL every season except for 2006. They have selected at least one player from the WHL every year except 2012.
    - The QMJHL is the only league in which the majority of Lombardi’s selections are not exclusively forwards.
    - If there’s a player in college you really like, don’t expect him to be taken early. Lombardi has drafted projects, but he just doesn’t spend high picks on those already in college. Lombardi has never drafted a player out of high school.
    - A staggering 18% of all his selections have been forwards in the OHL. The second largest group is WHL forwards at 13%. The largest disparity of positional draft to a league is in the NCAA and Europe, where 71% of his selections from these two leagues have been forwards.
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  7. #17
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    Ivan Barbashev


    BIO
    DOB: 12/14/1995
    Height: 6’1
    Weight: 185 lbs
    Team: Moncton Wildcats (QMJHL)
    Position: Center
    Shoots: Left

    Rankings
    Central Scouting: 12th among North American Skaters

    Articles

    He is known as a playmaker, using vision, speed, and passing ability to set teammates up, but he also has nice finishing ability and is not afraid to drive to the net to use it. He is the kind of player that thrives in a fast-pace offense. Defensively, he has improved a lot this season. He has great hockey sense in the defensive zone and is not afraid to check or be checked to make a play.
    2014 NHL Draft Profile: Ivan Barbashev - On the Forecheck

    "Ivan is a strong skater; he reaches top speed quickly and is a very good playmaker with quick hands," Central Scouting Director Dan Marr said. "He's not afraid to mix it up, competes one-on-one and battles for pucks. He can be a game breaker."
    Barbashev was the No. 1 pick by the Wildcats in the 2012 CHL import draft. He was inserted on the top line alongside Sam Reinhart of the Kootenay Ice and Michael Dal Colle of the Oshawa Generals for Team Cherry at the CHL/NHL Top Prospects Game in Calgary in January and had one assist.
    "He's a tough kid; will play and give it his best," Central Scouting's Chris Bordeleau said. "He's a good skater."
    Ivan Barbashev finding his way in North American game - Prospects

    My Take
    I definitely agree with what many have written here. He sees and uses the ice incredibly well, and his hands are top notch. What I love most about him is his willingness to dish a solid hit along the boards.

    He does play a disciplined game in the defensive zone and he is usually the first forward back, but I would like to see him play more on the penalty kill to see how he handles some of the most difficult minutes before lauding him as a defensive player.

    Most of the shots I’ve seen from him stay low; he scores a good number of goals, but I wouldn’t really say he’s a sniper. He’s definitely a playmaker first. What he also has going for him is making the seamless transition from wing to center. The utility can give him a lot of opportunity in the NHL.

    2013-2014 Statistics
    Super Series: 2 GP, 2g, 0a, 2 pts, 0 PIM, +1
    WJC U-20: 7 GP, 1g, 1a, 2 pts, 0 PIM, +1
    QMJHL Regular: 48 GP, 25g, 43a, 68 pts, 27 PIM, -11
    QMJHL Playoffs: 6 GP, 4g, 6a, 10 pts, 8 PIM, -2

    Video
    Last edited by King'sPawn; June 15th, 2014 at 09:44 AM.
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  8. #18
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    Roland McKeown


    BIO
    DOB: 1/20/1996
    Height: 6’0
    Weight: 197
    Team: Kingston Frontenacs (OHL)
    Position: Defense
    Shoots: Right

    Rankings
    Central Scouting: 15th among North American skaters

    Articles
    "I am a year older and more experienced. My knowledge of the league is better. I find when you move the puck up quickly to the forwards, the offence will come," he said, adding that a few more points on the power play have helped pad his stats.

    Knowing when to join the rush is his biggest challenge, admits McKeown. He has had conversations with Coach Gill in practice, trying to get better in that area. Coach Gill said McKeown's desire to improve in this area has paid off.

    "Sometimes when you're that talented it's hard to know when to back off. Less is more," Gill said. "Roland, by doing less, is now doing more for the team."
    McKeown unfazed by NHL talk surrounding him

    "I want to keep working on my neutral zone play," says McKeown, whose father Neil was one general manager of the Listowel Cyclones Junior B team. "If you ask me, games are won and lost in there. Whether it’s making a pass to a forward who goes down and creates a chance or gapping up against the opposing forwards."
    http://ca.sports.yahoo.com/blogs/jrh...193859430.html

    My Take
    He definitely says the right things, showing a more sophisticated understanding of the game compared to other players his age. He is positionally sound, making smart jumps in the offensive zone and has stayed back at key times while his teammates cycle the puck.

    I think his skating ability is a bit overstated. It’s not bad, but it’s not exceptional either. I’d say it ranges between “good and very good.” He needs to add some snarl to his game, though. He relies too much on using his stick to knock the puck away. He doesn’t throw his weight around much at all.

    With all this in mind, I think he compares very well to a player like Visnovsky.

    2013-2014 Statistics
    Hlinka U-18: 5 GP, 0g, 1a, 1 pt, 6 PIM, +0
    OHL Regular: 62 GP, 11g, 32a, 43 pts, 61 PIM, +38
    OHL Playoffs: 7 GP, 1g, 3a, 4 pts, 8 PIM, +6
    WJC U-18: 7GP, 0g, 1a, 1 pt, 2 PIM, +3

    Video
    Last edited by King'sPawn; June 15th, 2014 at 09:49 AM.
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  9. #19
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    Incredibly insightful. Love this type of stuff. Well done and thank you.
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  10. #20
    nki
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    Great thread as always. Will be monitoring this.
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