Page 5 of 20 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 15 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 196
  1. #41
    Let the kids play ASUcruz's Avatar




    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    11,858
    Liked
    21 times
    Karma
    1000000
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    #25 Javy Guerra
    RHP
    B-R
    T-R
    6-1 196

    Quote Originally Posted by Baseball America

    During a second straight season in high Class A, Guerra made progress in 2008. Still rounding into form after 2005 Tommy John surgery, he moved to the bullpen, better suited for his aggressive power arsenal, and made a solid impression in Hawaii Winter Baseball, where he had one of the league’s harder fastballs.

    A bit undersized, Guerra has a quick arm that produces a hard but straight fastball at 89-93 MPH, occasionally hitting 96. His command was off last year as he had a delivery flaw with his lead leg, and his mechanics have been a work in progress since removing a crow hop he had in his motion as an amateur.

    He has a slider, a changeup, and a curveball that can be above-average at time, but he needs to improve his control of all his pitches, his feel for pitching and his maturity. At times in the past he hasn’t taken the game as seriously as he needs to. Guerra passed through the Rule 5 draft unscathed and should head to Double-A in 2009.

  2. #42
    Let the kids play ASUcruz's Avatar




    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    11,858
    Liked
    21 times
    Karma
    1000000
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    #7 Devaris Gordon

    Here's a good read on Devaris Gordon. I'm excited about this kid.

    GLENDALE, Ariz.—He's lived a life unlike most other minor leaguers, having traveled the continent with his big league dad, filled in as a bat boy here and there and enjoyed the comforts of four-star hotels.

    That's not to say that Devaris Gordon, son of veteran big league reliever Tom Gordon, would rather breeze through the minors and not enjoy the ride.

    Because, frankly, the Dodgers' 20-year-old shortstop and 2008 fourth-round pick can't wait to experience a summer with the low Class A Great Lakes Loons—a time in his life that he figures ought to be as much about making great memories and forging lasting friendships as it will be about developing as a player.

    If that means busing overnight, scarfing down the Grand Slam at Dennys and staying at the Econo Lodges, Best Westerns and Super 8s of the Midwest League, all the better.

    "Bus rides are fun, especially those overnight ones," Gordon was saying in spring training. "In (Rookie-level) Ogden last year, we had one where they were blowing up a mountain in Yellowstone. We were on the side of the road for two hours. There was a lot of good bonding. There was no cell phone service. It was just you and your teammates."

    Gordon has a very good reason for wanting to enjoy life in the minors: If the assembled cast of teammates on the Great Lakes roster manifests itself into a league championship, a winning environment would create the ideal setting for personal career growth.

    This in a year when Gordon hopes to enhance his leadoff skills—beyond being a nice bunter—as well as show he can remain an up-the-middle anchor. His other task may be much more difficult, though, as Gordon tries to pack on the muscle in an effort to lose a body type (5-foot-11, 165 pounds) that could easily be mistaken for a skinny sophomore twig on the JV basketball team.

    "I'm looking forward to getting a ring. I'm not really into losing," Gordon said. "I want to win every night I'm playing.

    "You want to have quality at-bats and play a quality game. You want to be up for your teammates," Gordon continued. "As a leadoff man, they consider me a sparkplug. I know I may be young but they're expecting a lot out of me. So I've got to do the right things, on and off the field."

    Adding Pounds
    That Gordon speaks more like a veteran than a recent juco player on the verge of his first full season in pro ball is an encouraging sign to those in the Dodgers system.

    Spring training was mostly productive throughout as recent draft picks such as righthander Ethan Martin and one-time NCAA home run champ Kyle Russell teamed with Gordon on the Great Lakes club while 2008 second-round pick Josh Lindblom threatened to make the Dodgers' Opening Day roster.

    But the loss of shortstop Ivan DeJesus Jr., a sensation last year at Double-A Jacksonville, to a broken leg suffered in a collision at home plate left a bittersweet taste in minor league camp.

    Having Gordon around, with a bounce in his step and motivation to win, fortunately made for a more positive environment.

    "That's what we want to instill in all of our players, to understand what it takes to win," Dodgers farm director DeJon Watson said. "I think our scouting department is doing a nice job of bringing in that winning mindset to our organization. That's a positive."

    The Dodgers took a slight risk last year in drafting Gordon out of Seminole (Fla.) CC. Because of a grade mix-up, the shortstop was not allowed to play that spring and, therefore, there were no immediate in-game scouting reports to decipher.

    But the Dodgers benefitted from having Watson as farm director. In his Royals minor league days, he had roomed with Tom Gordon and knew the family well. He likes Devaris for a number of reasons: his leadoff abilities, speed, range at short.

    Yet the big question is whether Gordon can add muscle to his lean frame. He is trying. He said he is eating at least five times a day.

    "I just have a fast metabolism right now. It's just not there yet," Gordon said, acknowledging protein shakes are included in his daily eating ritual. "(His dad) says it's going to come in time. I read the back of one of his baseball cards and it said when he was 20 he was 165 pounds. That's pretty much where I'm at."

    His dad, with the Phillies since 2006, is now listed as a 5-11, 190-pound reliever.

    "(Eating regularly) was hard in the offseason but I'm used to it now," Gordon said. "It's kind of my daily habit. I've been able to maintain it. I've already added five pounds."

    Still, Watson is optimistic that Gordon's body will mature but makes clear that he has hidden strength.

    "He's lean and wiry, but he's strong," Watson said. "For me, his size is deceiving. There is durabilty in his body. So I'm not worried. I think he's going to be fine."

    The key will be whether Gordon can continue to eat healthy during the season. Because of the natural proximity of their minor leaguers in spring training, the organization could closely monitor players' intake. They will try to continue to keep close tabs on them throughout the season even thought stops at, say, fast-food joints on bus trips are almost unavoidable.

    "We try to educate every one of our players on what to eat," Watson said. "We've had discussions with nutrionists on what they eat prior to workouts and what they eat after workouts. But you're still dealing with young kids."

    At The Plate
    Should Gordon add muscle, it could make all the difference in him losing a perceived reputation as a bunting/slap-hitting, top-of-the-order weapon.

    That will be one of his goals this season, to zero in on learning the nuances of leading off.

    "I like being a line drive hitter, not just a slap hitter," Gordon said. "It's great to bunt and I like bunting. But if they know you're bunting and that's all you can do, you have no dimensions to your game.

    "I'm just trying to square it up and have a good at-bat," Gordon added. "The big thing is laying off the high pitch. I love to drive it. But it drives my hitting coaches crazy."

    That's all part of learning in a first full season, as taking small steps will lead to a better, broader picture at season's end.

    Scouts reported last year that he sprayed the ball to the gaps in ranking fourth among prospects in the Pioneer League. In leading off for Ogden, he finished .331/.371/.430 (83-for-251) with two home runs, 13 doubles and 27 RBIs. He also struck out 29 times and drew 16 walks, then stole 18 bags in 23 attempts.

    However, Gordon is realistic. He figures there will be highs and lows this year and that it success will come as he pulls himself out of the lows quickly and recognizing the positives even during difficult stretches.

    "You've got to learn the mental side of (the game). You have to learn how to fail before you succeed," Gordon said. "I feel that's the advantage I have, from watching my dad go through his ups and downs. He's helped me understand that you are going to go 0-for-4 or 0-for-5. But you have to take that 0-for-5 and say, 'I had three good at-bats.' That'll get you out of that slump quickly."

    That attitude has not been lost among Dodgers coaches.

    "He doesn't come off that he's better than anybody else," Dodgers hitting coordinator Gene Clines said. "He's one of the hardest working kids we've had in camp. He listens and learns."

    Clines continued.

    "Offensively, we're just trying to get his feet wet. He's got speed, bunts and he's a good hitter—just a young player we want to take slowly and let play," Clines said. "I still look at him as a high school kid. He's going to go through his ups and down. That's why we're going to take it slow. Once he learns he can compete against older guys, he's going to be fine."

    Clines is impressed already with Gordon's bunting ability but did issue an edict that he he attempt a bunt at least once in every spring training game. However, he also sees the ability to hit line drives.

    "He's holding his own. It's just a long process," Clines said. "It's going to be interesting to see how he does in the Midwest League."

    Bus rides. Dennys. Super 8s and all.

    "It's going to be a great year. I can't wait to enjoy it," Gordon said. "The team, the fans, the season. Next year at this time I want to say I stayed healthy, had a great year and did a lot of great things. And that I have a ring."

  3. #43
    Let the kids play ASUcruz's Avatar




    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    11,858
    Liked
    21 times
    Karma
    1000000
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    #26 James Adkins
    LHP
    B-L
    T-L
    6-5 195

    Quote Originally Posted by Baseball America

    Signed for $787,500 in 2007 after becoming Tennessee’s all-time strikeout leader, Adkins actually pitched better after a late-July promotion in Double-A in his first full pro season last year. Limited to short outings in his first pro season because of his heavy workload in college, he shied away from using his below-average fastball and as a result didn’t throw enough strikes. His big 11-to-5 curve and slider both have a chance to become plus pitches.

    But Adkins is tall, awkward, and unathletic. Comparable to Brian Tallet, Adkins needs to work on using his fastball, even though it has below-average 87-89 MPH velocity, and commanding it in the strike zone. He just hasn’t showed enough fastballs to learn to command the pitch yet. He does throw downhill and earns high marks for his improved work habits and good competitiveness.

    With improved strength and endurance, Adkins profiles as a back-end starter in the Doug Davis mold. If that fails, his pair of breaking balls makes him a potential relief specialist. He’s headed back to Double-A in 2009.

  4. #44
    Let the kids play ASUcruz's Avatar




    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    11,858
    Liked
    21 times
    Karma
    1000000
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    #27 Alfredo Silverio
    OF
    B-R
    T-R
    6-2 164

    Quote Originally Posted by Baseball America

    A year after leading the Gulf Coast League in average (.373), hits (72) and RBI (46) in 2007, Silverio seemed on the verge of a breakout season. He began 2008 in extended spring training due to a tender shoulder, as the Dodgers held him back from the cold of the Midwest League. He then joined Great Lakes in early May and found tougher sledding than he had in Rookie ball. He was at his best down the stretch, hitting .304 with 15 RBI over his final 25 games. As a free swinger who rarely walks (53 in 291 career games), he remains a project who is still a long way away from the majors.

    Silverio, who has drawn physical comparisons to George Bell, has a chance to hit for power if his approach improves. And while his arm is well above-average, the rest of his defense needs work. The Dodgers sent him to Hawaii Winter Baseball with an emphasis on quality at-bats-working the count and getting a good pitch to hit. He help up fairly well under the long grind. The Dodgers see Silverio as a strong, physical corner outfielder, and that projection depends mostly on his plate discipline. He’s headed to high Class A in 2009.

  5. #45
    Let the kids play ASUcruz's Avatar




    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    11,858
    Liked
    21 times
    Karma
    1000000
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

  6. #46
    Let the kids play ASUcruz's Avatar




    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    11,858
    Liked
    21 times
    Karma
    1000000
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    #28 Lucas May
    C
    B-R
    T-R
    6-0 190

    Quote Originally Posted by Baseball America

    After moving from shortstop to outfield in 2005, May converted to catcher in 2007 and was added to the 40-man roster in 2008. After a big season in the California League he spent time in big league camp but surprised the organization when he struggled with Double-A pitching, offensively and defensively in 2008. May’s inexperience shows behind the plate; he is still learning how to handle a pitching staff and how to call a game. Like a smaller version of Michael Barrett, he has the athleticism, arm strength, and agility but his catching and throwing while improving, still need sharpening. He committed 24 passed balls last year after 31 in 2007, and threw out just 29 percent on basestealers last season.

    His athletic ability has helped him make some adjustments, and while the Dodgers loved May’s makeup, he has lost weight needs to work on maintaining his strength at his new position. May, who played against Blake DeWitt in their high-school days, has good bat speed and very good power potential but doesn’t make adjustments at the plate and gets power-happy, chasing breaking balls away. He’ll return to Double-A searching for more consistency in all phases of the game this season.

  7. #47
    Let the kids play ASUcruz's Avatar




    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    11,858
    Liked
    21 times
    Karma
    1000000
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    #29 Josh Wall
    RHP
    B-R
    T-R
    6-6 192

    Quote Originally Posted by Baseball America

    Maturity has been an issue for Wall, who signed for $480,000 after he was drafted between Kevin Slowey and Yunel Escobar. Wall is tall and rangy, built lie Aaron Sele, and while he can hit 95-96 MPH with good arm action he sometimes sits at 88-91, just major league average. He has a curve that has some tilt and depth that long has been his best pitch, another facet that earns him comparisons to Sele. He also throws a slider and a changeup.

    Somedays Wall is unhittable; some days everything is over the plate. He was pushed to high Class A at 19 last year and wasn’t aggressive enough in the strike zone. Wall is still learning the nuances of being a professional, such as having a between-starts routine and how to study hitters. If Wall matures physically and mentally, he could be a middle-to-back-of-the-rotation starter, and to this point, his best asset has been durability, as he’s thrown 258 innings the last two seasons combined. He’s most likely headed back to Inland Empire for 2009.

  8. #48
    Let the kids play ASUcruz's Avatar




    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    11,858
    Liked
    21 times
    Karma
    1000000
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    #30 Jordan Pratt
    RHP
    B-R
    T-R
    6-3 195

    Quote Originally Posted by Baseball America

    Pratt has yet to progress past Class A and passed through the Rule 5 draft unscathed, yet the Dodgers remain excited about his potential. He was the No. 2 ranked player in Oregon in the 2003 draft behind fellow prep righty Dallas Buck, who went on to star at Oregon State.

    Pratt signed out of high school and has made slow progress harnessing his electric arsenal. His fastball runs up to 94 MPH, and it features natural cutting action that makes it a buzzsaw against lefthanders. They posted a .589 OPS against Pratt in the hitter-friendly California League with two extra-base hits, and he held them to a 2-for-35 mark in Hawaii Winter Baseball. Pratt also has a power curveball and short, sharp slider that grade out as average to above-average as well.

    The problem is command, as he ranked third in the Cal League in walks even while making only one start, and his 21 wild pitches led the leagues. Scouts who saw Pratt in Hawaii said he showed better control there by being more consistent keeping his front shoulder closed. He tends to over-analyze his mistakes rather than making quick adjustments. The Dodgers hope to push him to Double-A in 2009.

  9. #49
    Let the kids play ASUcruz's Avatar




    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    11,858
    Liked
    21 times
    Karma
    1000000
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Alright all 30 profiles are up and the front page is updated. I plan on adding an "Major Leagues in the Minors Section" so we can keep tabs on guys like Hu or Repko who aren't necessarily prospects but will probably see time in the majors. Also I will add another section for prospects who weren't ranked by BA but still have promising futures, a guy like Cole St. Clair comes to mind.

  10. #50
    Let the kids play ASUcruz's Avatar




    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    11,858
    Liked
    21 times
    Karma
    1000000
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

    Default

    Here's a bit about McDonald from the Keith Law chat

    Viktor (Azusa, CA): You buy into the Dodgers don't have enough pitching mantra? McDonald should be an adequate 5th starter right? And on the probable chance that Wolf breaks down in a couple months there should be some options on the trade market, so is they're starting staff any more of a liability than the next team?

    SportsNation Keith Law: I like McDonald quite a bit and am glad they gave him the job - minor league hitters just don't hit him, and the stuff is good enough to play in the majors. I mean, sure, they could use another starter, but couldn't just about every team in the majors? Boston, Tampa ... okay, that's the list of teams that probably have enough starters.

Page 5 of 20 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 6 7 15 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28