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Thread: Official Dodgers 2010 Post-Mortem Thread...

  1. #51
    I'M THIRTY-SEVEN? DanteHicks's Avatar




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    Looks like Barajas and Ellis will be doing the catching next season.

    http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?...rtnerId=rss_la

  2. #52
    Tom Emanski Spokesman Frolov24's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by DanteHicks View Post
    Looks like Barajas and Ellis will be doing the catching next season.

    http://mlb.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?...rtnerId=rss_la
    So the Dodgers are paying Uribe and Barajas $10.25 million combined next year. Can't say I think this is the best use of payroll, but I guess they fill two holes in the lineup. I liked the starting pitcher deals, but I am not thrilled with how Ned has gone about "improving" the offense this offseason.
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  3. #53
    Genghis John
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    What happened to George Sherrill? Did we get really lucky at first or did He start doing meth?

  4. #54
    1st Scoring Line keyTOarson's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by Genghis John View Post
    What happened to George Sherrill? Did we get really lucky at first or did He start doing meth?
    If Torre had played him to his strength last season (pitching against lefties) he probably would have had a much better season. His season before was a bit of smoke and mirrors. He was good, but not as good as his numbers indicated.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Scioscia's Tragic Illness
    Even in this completely nightmarish season, Sherrill was still pretty effective against lefties, ending the year at .192/.286/.288 against them, which puts his OPS against LHP at almost exactly what Pedro Feliciano of the Mets – well-regarded as a lefty-killer – had.
    Here's their whole analysis of his season:

    Quote Originally Posted by www.mikesciosciastragicillness.com
    I think a lot of people are expecting me to rationalize Sherrill’s terrible year, and claim that it wasn’t that bad at all. I’m not, and it was. It’s just important to realize that there’s a bit more to it than just “holy crap, this guy suddenly became awful.”

    Before we even get into how his 2010 unfolded, do remember that expectations for Sherrill were unfairly inflated headed into the season. His shiny 0.65 ERA as a Dodger in 2009 had people thinking he was a stud, and while he was very good, he actually struck out fewer and walked more in LA than he’d done with Baltimore in the tough AL East. (Just another example of why ERA, particularly for relievers, isn’t the best tool to judge a pitcher, friends. Did we really expect that 621 OPS+ from last year was going to stick?)

    So I certainly expected some regression. But this? No, not even I saw this coming. We first started hearing about trouble with Sherrill in the first days of spring training, as he’d reported with sore knees and then took a line drive off his right ankle, though it was reportedly not serious. Sherrill made it through the spring, and made his season debut in the 8th inning of Opening Day in Pittsburgh. How’d that go?

    Even more concerning than that mess was the self-immolation of George Sherrill, who was so brilliant for the Dodgers last season. After an entire spring of hearing him claim that his mechanical issues were “no big deal” and that he’d be fine when the season started, he came in and after getting two quick outs, allowed a walk, a double, and a three-run homer to Ryan Doumit. With Hong-Chih Kuo on the DL and Scott Elbert trying to be a starter in ABQ, the Dodgers may be have a serious lefty problem in the pen if Sherrill can’t get straightened out, and quick.

    But it didn’t get better. He allowed runs in three of his first five games, including blowing his first save opportunity on April 10 in Florida, and didn’t manage to get through an outing without issuing a walk until his sixth time out. He perked up a bit at the end of April, going eight straight games without allowing a run, but it was still troubling that he’d managed to strike out just two in that time. By the end of the month, he’d walked ten and struck out only five.

    May started with back-to-back disasters, and ended when he was placed on the DL with “mid-back tightness”, as the club needed a roster spot for the returning Rafael Furcal. He missed barely the minimum, and returned to allow a run against the Angels on June 11. Few remember it now, since it was Jonathan Broxton who blew up in the 9th and Ramon Troncoso who got the loss in the books, but it was actually Sherrill who gave up the two-run homer to Robinson Cano in the tied 10th inning of the infamous June 27th disaster against the Yankees on Sunday Night Baseball.

    Two days later, on June 29, I looked into what had happened to Sherrill, and started off with a shocking realization:

    in looking at Sherrill’s game log, one thing jumped out at me so clearly that I can’t possibly bury it any further: George Sherrill hasn’t had a strikeout since May 17. That’s more than six weeks ago, ever since he struck out Houston’s Michael Bourn (who struck out 140 times last year) in the 8th inning of a 6-2 Dodger win in Los Angeles. By (a completely unfair) comparison, Clayton Kershaw has 56 strikeouts since Sherrill’s seen his last one. He’s clearly fooling no one. How can you succeed like that?

    Obviously, you can’t. Here’s why:

    It’s not that hard to see what’s causing this, either. He’s not throwing as hard (88.3 MPH average on his fastball, lowest of his career). He’s not getting anyone to chase junk out of the zone (swings on just 21.1% of his pitches outside the strike zone, tied for his lowest ever). He’s not avoiding bats on any pitches (85.1% of his pitches are met with contact, and he’s getting just 5.5% swinging strikes, each worst of his career).

    So is he hurt? He claims no, despite missing time this season with a bad back. There’s been questions all year about his mechanics, theories that his offseason was too short, and stories about being “cured” by watching Billy Wagner on TV. Obviously, none of it has worked. Maybe it’s all of the above. Or none.

    Sherrill then went out and gave up runs in two of his next three outings, and the other shoe dropped over the All-Star Break, as he was put on waivers. That fooled a lot of people into thinking that he was off the roster immediately – since he clearly wasn’t claimed, he never left the team – but the timing made the team’s distaste clear.

    His nightmare season continued when he allowed runs in his first two post-break outings, got stuck with the loss when he wasn’t warmed in the bizarre “Mattingly’s two mound visits” game, and finished out July with another blown save in San Diego. Well, okay, that one wasn’t totally his fault, and I apologize for the length on this, but it’s awesome:

    First of all, please be sure to note that the two hits Sherrill allowed came on two ground ball singles which found their way through the infield. A few feet in either direction and the plays get made, and no one talks about George Sherrill at all. It’s not like he gave up two liners, hit a guy, and allowed a grand slam, despite what you may read elsewhere.

    Here’s the part that makes even less sense: George Sherrill has been atrocious all year. You don’t bring him into the 9th inning of a tie game, but you especially don’t bring him in to face a right handed hitter. I’ve said this so many times in recent weeks that I won’t even bother linking to it, but if there’s one way that Sherrill can help the team, it’s in that he can still be effective against lefties. Cover your eyes before I post these splits:

    Sherrill vs RHB, 2010: .436/.515/.745
    Sherrill vs LHB, 2010: .190/.314/.333

    Yet the first batter in the 9th inning was Scott Hairston, a righty. He got a base hit. Lefty Tony Gwynn Jr. sacrificed him to second, and the Padres – who clearly had read the scouting reports – pinch-hit for Everth Cabrera with righty Oscar Salazar.

    Before we go further, I just want to drive this point home:

    1) The winning run is on second.
    2) George Sherrill cannot get righties out.
    3) George Sherrill has already allowed a hit to a righty.
    4) A righty is at the plate.

    At this point, you’d think – you’d pray – that Torre would have put down his Bigelow green tea and decided to do something to, you know, manage the team to a victory. Like bring in Jonathan Broxton, say.

    But no. Sherrill remained in the game. Salazar bounced a grounder up the middle. And the Dodgers are further out of 1st place than they’ve been all season. And you wonder why I don’t want to see them trade for a starter. What we really need to see are losing teams who put their managers on the trade block, because that’s where the Dodgers really need an upgrade.

    Sherrill didn’t really perk up much over the remainder of the season (though he did amusingly draw a walk in his first big-league at-bat), but he wasn’t completely useless, as the quote above alludes to. Even in this completely nightmarish season, Sherrill was still pretty effective against lefties, ending the year at .192/.286/.288 against them, which puts his OPS against LHP at almost exactly what Pedro Feliciano of the Mets – well-regarded as a lefty-killer – had. It doesn’t make his unholy lack of success against righties okay, of course, but it’s something.

    The Dodgers were almost certainly not going to pick up Sherrill’s 2011 $6.5m option, an absurd amount for a non-elite reliever, even if he’d had a good season. Now? He’s the most obvious non-tender in baseball, and may be looking at minor-league deals at best for next year.

  5. #55
    Tom Emanski Spokesman Frolov24's Avatar




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    Dodgers ranked as #1 team at drafting players.

    http://bleacherreport.com/articles/5...-teams#page/31
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  6. #56
    Tom Emanski Spokesman Frolov24's Avatar




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    On the same day that the Dodgers reportedly said Loney will not be dealt, word is that the Dodgers and Brewers are discussing a Loney + Broxton for Fielder trade.

    This obviously would be a huge deal for LA, if they are willing to spend the huge dollars it would take to sign Fielder to an extension. The concern is that Fielder could be a DH type fairly quickly, and would the Dodgers be stuck with a big hitting/poor fielding player within a couple years? But there's no doubt he's bring a huge power bat to the middle of the lineup. Ethier/Fielder/Kemp is a pretty imposing trio.

    That said, I'm skeptical that this trade gets done. The Brewers could do better IMO.

    http://sports.espn.go.com/los-angele...ory?id=5892211
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  7. #57
    1st Scoring Line keyTOarson's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by Frolov24 View Post
    On the same day that the Dodgers reportedly said Loney will not be dealt, word is that the Dodgers and Brewers are discussing a Loney + Broxton for Fielder trade.

    This obviously would be a huge deal for LA, if they are willing to spend the huge dollars it would take to sign Fielder to an extension. The concern is that Fielder could be a DH type fairly quickly, and would the Dodgers be stuck with a big hitting/poor fielding player within a couple years? But there's no doubt he's bring a huge power bat to the middle of the lineup. Ethier/Fielder/Kemp is a pretty imposing trio.

    That said, I'm skeptical that this trade gets done. The Brewers could do better IMO.

    http://sports.espn.go.com/los-angele...ory?id=5892211
    Looks like those rumors were shot down pretty quickly from what I've seen.

  8. #58
    1st Scoring Line keyTOarson's Avatar




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    Tony Gwynn Jr.? What a joke. He is not what the Dodgers need at all.

  9. #59
    Tom Emanski Spokesman Frolov24's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by keyTOarson View Post
    Tony Gwynn Jr.? What a joke. He is not what the Dodgers need at all.
    If he's replacing Reed Johnson at a 4th/5th outfielder then it's a good deal. Gwynn is only making $675k, and is considered by some to be the top defensive CF in the league. He'd be a great defensive replacement/spot starter. But he's not the answer as the 3rd outfielder. Word is they are still looking for a LF starter to team with Gibbons, likely Diaz, Francoeur, or Bill Hall. Diaz is the best hitter of the bunch, but has the least power too. Hall and Francoeur are OBP nightmares, which could be an issue in a lineup that already features OBP challenged hitters in Kemp, Blake, Barajas, and Uribe.
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  10. #60
    1st Scoring Line keyTOarson's Avatar




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    Quote Originally Posted by Frolov24 View Post
    If he's replacing Reed Johnson at a 4th/5th outfielder then it's a good deal. Gwynn is only making $675k, and is considered by some to be the top defensive CF in the league. He'd be a great defensive replacement/spot starter. But he's not the answer as the 3rd outfielder. Word is they are still looking for a LF starter to team with Gibbons, likely Diaz, Francoeur, or Bill Hall. Diaz is the best hitter of the bunch, but has the least power too. Hall and Francoeur are OBP nightmares, which could be an issue in a lineup that already features OBP challenged hitters in Kemp, Blake, Barajas, and Uribe.
    Tony Jackson's article on the signing stated that Gwynn is expected to get the majority of the playing time in left field. If that's the case, this is an utter failure on Ned's part. I will be somewhat happier if they can bring in someone like Diaz or Willingham.

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